"Chivalry Is Dead", says the lieutenant as he stabs the enemy. "Rot in hell", cries the damsel as she slaps the lieutenant. HR looks at me, "WTF is your story about, Sexo & Muerto 4?" #boringAF (0.6k) - You've Got Hate Mail
7164
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-7164,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,qode_popup_menu_push_text_top,footer_responsive_adv,qode-theme-ver-10.1.1,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.2,vc_responsive
 

“Chivalry Is Dead”, says the lieutenant as he stabs the enemy. “Rot in hell”, cries the damsel as she slaps the lieutenant. HR looks at me, “WTF is your story about, Sexo & Muerto 4?” #boringAF (0.6k)

“Chivalry Is Dead”, says the lieutenant as he stabs the enemy. “Rot in hell”, cries the damsel as she slaps the lieutenant. HR looks at me, “WTF is your story about, Sexo & Muerto 4?” #boringAF (0.6k)

“How do you write so much?”, HR looks at me as she puts down the manuscript.

“How do I keep up with my memory of my time on Earth?”, I reply as I pick up the stack of papers.

“You think that you’re going to win?”, HR replies as she turns her head from the window to me, “is your story that good?”

“It’s an interesting question”, I say as I turn my head to look out the window, “all we have is a breath to power our actions; our hands with fingers crossed behind our backs; wishing for something to change; knowing we fear the unknown; try just a little and you will be at the head of the pack; wolves hunt in groups; I think that I will give it a chance; without risking your false pretenses your assumptions become your points of failure; I will kill myself to not know what living is like; I feel a pause as I reflect on the horizon that is constantly moving away; do I chase after it or let it go?

“A simply yes or no would have been fine”, HR replies as she picks up the loose leaf hand written book and turns back to me, from the window, “so let me give it another look.”


You can´t be Jesus and a Christian; Siddhartha Gautama was the Buddha; the hero of mankind behaves like a jerk; team players lose; winners quit; this rant brought to you by prescribtion anxiety medication–get your life in order and then SEE, Yo! 


What Makes Romance So Romantic (and So Doomed)?

{Link Bit.ly/2tC5oB9}

… and what, if anything, can replace it?

Unfortunately, once something is realized—has, in a sense, become “a sure thing”—its dreamy, dazzling aspects begin to dull.

Which is to say that there’s something sadly transient about romantic love. That’s why it’s typically not seen as lasting very long. In fact, such love is sometimes viewed as a mere dalliance, or love affair—consider the “summer romance.” Still, as a qualification, it should be noted that romantic love can last almost indefinitely if it isn’t—or can’t be—brought to fruition. This is the case when insurmountable obstacles prevent two lovers from ever “crystallizing” their relationship.

Moreover (and just as commonly), there are cases in which the object of one’s adoration is unavailable, or simply doesn’t return one’s ardor. Such a one-way romance isn’t really subject to the at least partial disenchantment that over time is virtually guaranteed after a relationship has reached its mutual commitment stage. I’ve written two pieces (see here and here) on the curious phenomenon of unrequited love, and the consummate irony of such non-reciprocated affection should be obvious, for all the “romance” exists as idealized fantasy. Any attachment to the beloved is purely fictional, so it’s never exposed to the cold winds of reality.

But in a relationship that has been “realized,” romance is fated to grow into something far less electrifying. And while this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it’s unquestionably less mysterious, blissful, or special, the latter being the term frequently employed to describe romantic love. For with such love there’s something almost preternatural about the extraordinary flow of adoring sentiment that radiates between two lovers.

This is why counselors often advise couples to reawaken old passions by methodically restoring their relationship to it original, “special” status. Such attempts at “courtship revival” might take the form of surprising one’s partner with a gratuitous, but highly gratifying, gift; freely lavishing compliments on them; or engaging in new, adventurous, or even heart-in-your-mouth activities (river rafting, anyone?) in an effort to recapture the warm glow they’d so joyfully experienced when their relationship was new.

Consider this witty quote from Oscar Wilde: “The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I’ll certainly try to forget the fact.”